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Best Trail Camera Strategies for Your Summer

Trail Camera Strategies to Start This Summer

 

If you’re anything like us, you eat, sleep, and dream about deer hunting throughout the year. If there is a winter storm coming through, we’re thinking about the rut. If we’re sweating through a summer heat wave, we’re thinking about how to get ready for opening day. If that describes your lifestyle too, you probably also enjoy watching deer throughout the year by using trail cams. There’s just something special about trail cameras and how you can stealthily keep track of the deer herd on your property without them having a clue. Sure, you could start glassing fields or summer food plots in the evenings, but that takes more time than most of us actually have. Plus, you might not have any fields near you; maybe you hunt deer in a big woods setting where you can’t easily watch wildlife. These are the situations where having a few hunting cameras hung in key spots on your property can make a big difference to your hunting strategies next fall. Here are a few trail camera strategies to get you started this summer.

 

 

Top Trail Camera Strategies for This Summer

 

It’s not quite as simple as just throwing out a few trail cams in the woods and seeing what walks by. Sure, you could try that approach and you might get to see some wildlife eventually. But to get the most pictures, to get high-quality pictures, and to get information that will actually help you next fall, you need to focus on putting your trail camera in a spot that focuses deer traffic. Here are the best trail camera strategies for the summer.

 

Food Plots/Agricultural Fields

Food plots are great spots for getting pictures of deer for a few reasons. One, does and bucks alike need lots of calories in the spring to bounce back from the stress of winter. Throughout the summer, they need the food tonnage to build up their body weight and grow antlers to prepare for fall. This means high quality, protein rich forage! If you live in a forested area with very little agricultural food available, a single food plot is even more attractive to deer and your results will be better. Since it’s so critical for their survival, it’s probably the best place to hang trail cams on these locations.

 

 

 

For larger agricultural fields (e.g., corn, soybeans, alfalfa, etc.), the best location for game cameras might seem like the middle of the field where you can see the most deer. But since deer are creatures of the edge and will usually have set travel patterns throughout the summer, the best spot is generally along the field edge near a dominant trail. For smaller food plots (e.g., clover, cereal grains, brassicas, etc.), you can place a trail cam on a post in the middle of the plot without any issues. But really it comes down to just finding a spot that concentrates the activity and facing the game camera in the right direction. One thing to keep in mind is that facing cameras any direction but north will inevitably produce some glare in pictures at some time of the day.

 

Bedding Areas

Another reliable spot to capture deer pictures on your trail cams this summer is around their bedding area. After feeding throughout the night in destination fields or browsing in cutover areas, deer will shift to daytime bedding areas to chew their cud and rest. Often does and fawns will rest near or even within feeding areas, while bachelor groups of bucks will bed further away. Taking a quick scouting stroll from feeding areas and along main trails can lead you to bedding areas. They’re often easy to spot because of the oval depressions in the grass or weeds. If you’ve ever tackled a few habitat projects on your property, hinge cuts are great bedding areas to check out.

 

If you’ve designated some bedding areas as deer sanctuaries that are strictly off-limits throughout the year, try installing trail cams along trails on the fringe of the sanctuary instead. Be cautious about checking them too much towards the end of the summer when you want to really hold deer in-place. The bugs will likely be bad enough to convince you to only go once or twice the whole summer anyway. More than likely, you’ll find some small bedding areas outside of these sanctuaries too that you can set and forget until the end of the summer.

 

 

Travel Corridors

Of course, any main trails and travel corridors between the two areas above are also great spots to intercept deer movement. With a little desktop scouting, you can easily map these areas and find good potential corridors, but you likely have a few tree stands already hung in these areas anyway. Clear out the herbaceous vegetation in a spot along one of these trails so that you can get a clear trail camera picture. These small openings can also make deer pause long enough for a good picture.

 

When it comes to positioning your trail cams along trails, the common instinct is to place them so that the camera is off to the side facing perpendicular to the trail. Unfortunately, unless deer are really slow-moving, your camera will likely trigger too late and you’ll only get pictures of their rear end – hardly useful from a hunting perspective. Instead, try positioning your camera facing up or down along the direction of deer travel. Granted, you’ll still get pictures of deer moving away from you half the time, but you’ll get pictures of deer facing the camera the other half of the time.

 

 

Mineral Sites/Mineral Stations

Throughout the spring and summer, whitetails love to get an extra dose of minerals from the soil and plants around mineral stations. Lactating does need extra minerals to support their fawns, while Bucks need minerals to build their bony antlers. If you keep the station going for a couple years, you can easily train deer to keep coming back to it as a seasonal mineral source since fawns will be raised to use it. Eventually, the stations often become huge craters where deer have eaten the soil away. Luckily, you can easily set up a mineral site by scraping the debris away and exposing the soil in a given spot. Then you can incorporate some crushed mineral into the top inch of soil or simply place a block or rock on top of it. You can even place it on a semi-rotting stump, which will slowly absorb the minerals as well. But that’s about all it takes to set a station up.

 

If you’re installing one of these sites expressly for pictures, it’s best to locate it in a shaded understory area. Pictures from trail cams along fields and exposed sites often suffer from lots of glare, which greatly reduces the quality of the photos. But pictures within shaded areas can turn out crisp and clear any time of the day since light doesn’t interfere.

 

 

Water Sources

The final place that works great for trail cams are water sources, especially when paired with mineral sites. After eating something salty, we all crave a drink of water – deer are no different. Deer crave sodium due to the high amount of water they get in their metabolism during spring and summer. However, as the summer progresses and other waterholes or creeks go dry, a small water hole next to a mineral site will pull deer in. If you have natural wetlands, ponds, or streams on your property, you can easily locate mineral sites near them for the easiest solution. If you don’t have any water sources, you can easily sink a bucket, small rubber tank, or kid’s pool into the dirt to let it fill with rainwater. You can keep it cleaner by simply refilling it once you check cams. During hot summers or in southern, more arid areas, water sources can be the absolute best place for a trail camera setup, since it is such a draw for them.

 

How to Hang Trail Cameras and When to Check Them

 Once you’ve identified the spots and trail camera strategies you want to install this summer, it’s time to actually get them out. As already mentioned, pay attention to the direction you face your cameras, as south facing cameras will get lots of unusable pictures with a heavy glare. The one time you can get away with south facing trail cams is if you are in a forested or heavily shaded area. One of the best trail camera tips you’ll hear is to check the batteries and then recheck them to make sure they are fresh. You should also generally clear out some of the tall weeds, grasses, and even some brush in the area so you can avoid lots of false triggers. It’s a really deflating experience when you check your camera to find 1,000 pictures and 900 of them are of swaying grass. You can change the sensitivity level on many cameras to reduce this problem, but it still doesn’t hurt to make a small opening in front of the lens. Bring a simple folding saw with you when you enter the woods so you can easily cut any obstacles down.

 

Depending on where you’re hanging trail cameras, you may want to leave a trail to get back to them. For new deer bedding areas in big woods spots, for example, consider putting out some trail markers or trail marking tacks to help you find them again. This isn’t a good idea on public land, obviously, as would-be thieves could follow your tacks/markers right to the camera. But it’s a nice option for private land.

 

 

As far as when or how often to check your trail cams, it’s a tough call. The less you check them, the less invasive it is and more discrete your spying will be. After all, if you set it and forget about it for a few months, you can basically guarantee that you won’t interfere with the natural deer movement on your property. On the other hand, if your camera malfunctions after only a week of being outdoors, you could miss out on an entire summer’s worth of intelligence, which is just a terrible feeling (we’ve probably all had it happen at some point). Besides, we all feel the temptation to check them weekly. It’s kind of like Christmas morning when you get your chip and start to glance through them on the computer. If you have fresh batteries and haven’t had any issues with your camera before, let it sit in the woods for a month or two at a time, if you can bear it. If you’re not sure about your gear or if the opportunity is too great, then you’ve got two options. You can either charge right in making lots of noise (e.g., starting a chainsaw once in a while, driving an ATV, etc.), which will push deer away well before you spook them at close range. Or you can stealthily sneak in with scent-eliminating clothing and rubber boots to be incognito. It’s up to you and how your property is managed.

Good luck with your cameras this summer. With any luck, you’ll get some great pictures of deer to help guide your bow hunting on opening day this fall!

 

Planning Box Blind Setups for the Early Season

Pairing Food Plots with Box Blind Setups

 

As turkey season starts to wind down across the country and we put our box calls and decoys back in storage, many hunters enter the summer slump. It’s that weird time of year again where there are no more game animal hunting seasons and deer season seems like a long way off. But luckily, there’s a lot you can do right now to make a big difference this fall. Before you hit the dreaded slump, turn your attention to pairing a box blind setup with an attractive early season food source. It’s the perfect way to keep busy in the offseason and avoid the summer slump blues.

 

Benefits and Challenges with Hunting in Box Blinds

 

Box blinds have a lot going for them when it comes to effective deer hunting. They’re comfortable and spacious, which makes it a whole lot easier to spend on all-day sits waiting for the right deer to walk by. Challenging and unpredictable fall weather can keep us out of the woods when we just use a climber or hang-on stand, but you don’t have to worry about that when you’ve got a high-quality box blind. They also keep your scent contained and hide your profile and movements from wary game animals. This is a huge advantage when hunting with a partner, cameraman, or even with kids. But maybe even more importantly, it provides a good space for you to draw your bow without getting busted when there are lots of observant eyes around. In some locations (i.e., edge of a clover or bean field), there could be dozens of deer all watching for danger, which would make stealthily drawing your bow pretty tricky.

 

 

That being said, there are a few potential disadvantages if you don’t plan ahead fully. For example, if a hit-list buck starts avoiding a hunting location completely, there’s really no stealthy or easy way to move an entire box blind around. If you have a climbing tree stand, you could easily sneak away to a different tree and/or location without making much noise at all. But you can’t exactly sneak a tractor around your property without wary bucks at least noticing. Granted, if it’s a farmed property anyway, they’re probably used to the sights and sounds of tractors, and may not view it as a threat. But this is why planting the right food plot in the right location and using the right box blind setup makes such a difference.

 

The Perfect Box Blind Setup for Different Food Plots

 

As we mentioned, box blind placement is going to be critical to your success this season, especially if you plan on bow hunting more than rifle hunting. For ethical bow shots, you need to be a heck of a lot closer to them than with a rifle. This means you can’t just deploy a box blind anywhere – you need to really think about how deer move through the area first. To counter their lack of mobility, you should try to position them strategically for different parts of the hunting season. To make them even more effective and sweeten the pot, if you will, you should consider pairing them with a food plot or agricultural food source as well. These areas will usually be the best place to put a box blind. Let’s look at some examples.

 

Annual Agricultural Fields

Whether you hunt over corn or soybeans in a given year, there’s no denying that big ag fields can really pull deer from far and wide. Whitetails in farm country will usually pattern their feeding schedule around one of these fields. It serves as a destination food source, and deer will usually spend most of the night feeding in and resting near them. How can you take advantage of that fact? Place a box blind on the field edge!

 

 

Wait, wait, it’s not always that easy. If you’re bow hunting in a box blind, you can’t put the blind up just anywhere along the edge. Deer tend to take a few common trails into these fields, and then slowly disperse into the center where there is more food available (due to better conditions and less browsing). While you could make a shot into the center of the field with a rifle, you’re headed for disappointment if you have a bow in hand and bucks out of reach. In this case, you really need to find a spot to funnel and congregate the deer movement so you can make a shot.

 

One example would be a converging trail system. Deer will usually take several trails from different bedding areas, but they might converge on a field corner, for example, as the main entry point. Inside and outside corners of fields are great pinch points for bow hunting whitetails. Placing a Muddy® Bull box blind in one of these corners near a trail system puts you within bow range of deer movement for an easier shot opportunity without spooking deer when you leave for the night. Additionally, placing your blind just within the woods may give you a better chance at a daylight shot, since reclusive bucks may hang out on the field edge until just before dark. If they stage up in front of your box blind, you may just get a shot off before the light completely fades.

 

Another example might be putting a water hole along the field edge to concentrate deer activity for a close shot. As we mentioned, field fringes are usually less productive and get picked over faster than the field centers. As a result, deer tend to cruise right past these areas. But digging a shallow water hole along the fringe can be just enough of a draw, especially in hot early season conditions, to make deer pause more than long enough for a good shot.

Perennial Food Plots

Another popular option for all-season hunting opportunities would be a clover or alfalfa field. Perennial spring food plots are green and lush through most of the year and help deer and turkeys get a head start each spring by being some of the first green forage available. But these plots can also be one of the best spots for deer hunting blinds as deer start to feel the pressure of the early season bow hunting crowd. Bucks will naturally want to avoid large open fields as they get more cautious, and these hidden food plots can be the best spot to catch them still wandering around during the day.

 

Large alfalfa hayfields can be hunted and approached much like the agricultural scenario above. However, you can also very effectively use the Muddy® Bale Blind if you routinely hay these fields. This allows you to hunt further out into the field with a bow than you would be able to with a typical box blind setup. Just make sure there’s some kind of natural draw or fence line nearby that you can use to sneak in and out without spooking deer.

 

 

 

Many clover food plots tend to be smaller in size, located in the timber, or consist of narrow travel lanes instead of large plots. These areas can be hunted a little easier than open fields because there is generally more cover surrounding them to sneak into and out of the box blind setup. Perennial clover plots usually respond best by planting seeds in the fall, along with a cereal grain nurse crop. This will give you a hunting opportunity this fall, but the real magic happens in the following few years. By next fall, your clover plot will likely be lush and full provided you do some maintenance on it throughout the summer. Hunting in a box blind above one of these fields can be magical on some properties.

 

Using These Box Blind Hunting Tips

 

As you consider the options above for a stellar early season deer hunt, you should always keep access and practicality at the front of your mind. If a certain box blind setup might be difficult to sneak into without disturbing deer, it’s probably not a good spot to sit. But if you can easily slip in and out without a deer noticing you, you have a chance at a successful bow hunt. And when you’re using the box blind hunting strategies above and pairing them with a good food plot, you have a really good chance.

Deer Feeders

Deer Feeders 101 | Deer Feeding Tips, Concerns, and Strategies

Tips, Concerns, Results, and Strategies Deer Feeders 101

Deer feeders create an interest for deer hunters, wildlife enthusiasts, and animal lovers alike. Whether it’s simply a wildlife feeder in the back yard, in the wood lot next door, or a vital piece of your deer management plan, chances are you will encounter the want/need to own a deer feeder at some point or another. Surprisingly, deer feeders come in a variety of sizes, designs, and uses. From the general wildlife feeder to a critical supplemental feeding program, deer feeders can certainly pull their weight no matter the use. Given such use, it’s respectable to put together a string of helpful information, tips, strategies, and uses. Welcome to deer feeders 101.

Deer Feeder: A tool used to supply feed, usually in the form of grain (corn) or a specially blended deer/wildlife feed for nutrition, to deer or wildlife in supplemental feed programs.

Why Feed Deer?

More often than not a deer feeder’s use occurs on the most basic level you can imagine. Simple and consistent corn feeding throughout the winter months appears to “help” deer and other wildlife through cold temperatures and heavy snowfall. In fact, feeding deer in the winter is a big concern for deer, deer managers, and many states. This is why it is included front and center in this article.

Intervention in the form of a couple hundred pounds of “deer corn” can spell disaster for deer.  This is why states all across the northern stretches of the country restrict or outlaw the use of bait and feeding of deer. Some of this concern undoubtedly stems from the possible negative outcomes of gathering large numbers of deer in one place…diseases being the concern. Have you heard of Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD)? That’s one of the big ones! However, another more likely concern that often goes unknown to the person supplying the feed is called acidosis. Acidosis occurs when ruminants (deer) consume large quantities of carbohydrates that are low in fiber, also known as corn toxicity. A deer’s diet during the winter consists of high fiber woody browse, not low fiber carbohydrates. With a sudden intake of grain, an increase and change in the microbial population in the rumen causes a fatal increase of lactic acid. Dehydration as a result of the buildup of lactic acid can be fatal in 24-72 hours.

feeding-deer-feeders-101_pic1

Photo: New Hampshire Fish and Game. Five of the twelve deer found dead due to winter feeding in N.H.

However, concern over acidosis is waved throughout the Midwest and in areas where deer are already consuming corn. The corn maze of states in the Midwest such as Indiana, Illinois, and Iowa have so much corn readily available (either standing or left behind from the combine) during the winter months that the deer’s rumen and microbial population is adjusted for feeding. This also is true for properties and programs where supplemental feed is already taking place.

The well-being of the wildlife and deer should always be taken into consideration first before your wants and needs of either supplementing nutrition or for simply observational purposes.

The Results of Supplemental Feeding

For the more advanced deer managers and deer hunters, supplemental feeding always looms in the back of the mind. The number one reason for interest in supplemental feeding is always centered around the obsession of antlers…at least for the most part. It is widely known now that age, nutrition, and genetics (in that order) are the important factors that determine antlers and a buck’s score. Age and nutrition in particular are what we as deer managers can actively manage. Age is simply managing your trigger finger and the ability to age deer on the hoof accurately, leaving nutrition as a 365 day a year obsession.

feeding-deer-feeders-101_pic2

Habitat, food plots, and supplemental feeding are all management efforts we as deer managers can continually improve it seems. For the point of this article we will focus on supplemental feeding.

The big question is “can a supplemental feeding program increase the size and score of the bucks on my property?”. The answer is yes it can. If you ask the question you can be sure a deer biologist or two have as well, and they have found the answers through research.

“A study in Texas found that bucks fed a 16% crude protein diet grew antlers that scored 20 inches higher Boone and Crockett, than did bucks fed 8% crude protein (Hamel et al. 1989)” – MSU Deer Lab.

Deer Feed Requirements

16% crude protein is the agreed upon percentage of protein intake that maximizes antler growth, however, it doesn’t tell the whole story. Often time feed containing 18-20% protein can help balance protein intake that is significantly lower in the other portions of the deer’s diet, when natural browse and protein levels of food plots/crops might dip below 16%. It also important to note that the protein requirements of deer depend on age. Mature adults do not need the higher protein requirements that fawns or young bucks need when developing. MSU Deer Lab.

feeding-deer-feeders-101_pic4 (1)

Other than protein, minerals are also a thought pertaining to deer feed. In general, macro-minerals and micro-minerals are fulfilled by vegetation or eating the soil in natural licks. However, when it comes to deer management, it is always best to be safe. Identifying limiting factors of a property such as cover, water, or food is easy. When it comes to minerals a generally safe approach is ensuring the deer feed of choice contains the basics. These are mainly calcium and phosphorous.

Deer Feeder Advantages and Design

Knowing that a supplemental feeding program supplies benefits to the herd, and knowing what deer feed should consist of, the focus can now be turned to the feeder itself. A deer feeder offers several advantages over simply placing feed on the ground. Why? By knowing what goes into deer feeder designs, you discover their advantages. Access to feed and protection of feed are the most obvious advantages. The original thought towards a feeding program is usually brought on by a hard winter, or by the need to create an attraction for your trail camera/hunting site. The next thought is in the process you are currently in…research! You are trying to find out exactly what deer feed to use, if supplemental feeding programs work, or you are looking for deer feeder designs. That last one…deer feeder designs is because you are thinking of building your own. Why not, right? Seeing as how this is deer feeders 101, we have arrived at the same conclusion…sure, why not? Here is what makes a great deer feeder design…or a checklist if you will, to what a feeder needs in order to be successful.

feeding-deer-feeders-101_pic5

  • Waterproof – Nothing is worse than soggy, spoiled, and molded feed.
  • Locking Lid – A locking lid gives you the satisfaction that the feed is not only waterproof but its safe from nuaisance animals.
  • Durable – it has to survive rough weather and some of the biggest raccoons that appear more bear-like than a raccoon.
  • Dispenser – A deer feeder needs a dispenser of some sort. This comes in the form of a port, a broadcaster (spinner), or a port/agitator.
  • Large Quantities – Feeders with large quantities equate to less time filling. This is less time on your part but also less pressure associated with the feeder.

Sure you can build one or go ahead and come the conclusion that buying a sturdy feeder will last longer and will inevitably be more successful. We offer a 200lb Gravity Feeder, and by design, it features everything it needs…simplified to be a very successful deer feeder.


Muddy 200 LB. Gravity Feeder | Muddy Outdoors Product

(Video) MGF200 Gravity Feeder is unlike any gravity deer feeder on the market. It features an adjustable spring-loaded dispenser and agitator. This feature keeps the feed broke up and dispensing while animals feed. The feed is lockable, and the lid is user friendly but cannot slide off like other feeders. If you are looking for a new gravity deer feeder, check out Muddy Outdoors.

Feeders | Muddy Outdoors Hunting Accessories

PRODUCT FEATURES

  • Waterproof
  • Locking Lid
  • Spring-Loaded Dispenser and Agitator
  • Dispenser Easily Adjusts

PRODUCT SPECS

  • CONSTRUCTION: Steel
  • HEIGHT: 61” Fill Height, 42” Feed Height
  • CAPACITY: 200 Lbs./ 33 Gallons;
  • WEIGHT: 44 Lbs

Deer Feeder Strategies and Tips

If applicable, and if legal, these tips can be taken into consideration to either spike the efficiency of the feeder or the scenario of hunting over the feeder. Either way, these feeding tips excel the situation beyond a feeder sitting in a field! The diagram below helps paint the scene for your imagination.

 Deer Feeder Placement

Obviously, if you are in the research phase of either building or buying a deer feeder chances are you have a spot already picked out on your hunting property. What makes a “good spot” for a feeder? To start, high traffic areas are a must. However, you also have to factor in accessibility of a truck, ATV, or side-by-side that can reach the feeder. It is also important to think about what else should be paired with a feeder such as water, other food sources, security, proximity to bedding, and in states where it’s legal, your stand or blind. Another critical thought should be thrown in concerning human pressure. If the feeder is out in the open such as a large crop field or can be seen by someone driving on a road the anxiety of deer at the feeder will be high (not to mention potential poaching or theft problems). Keeping the feeder back in secluded, low anxiety areas can increase feeding and feeder success. Considering these factors can get a bit overwhelming so here is a list in order of how you should think about deer feeder placement.

  1. High traffic area
  2. Accessible via truck/ATV
  3. Human pressure/seclusion
  4. Ask yourself the question: “Does it work with my hunting strategy?”
  5. Proximity to other food sources
  6. Proximity to water
  7. Proximity to bedding

 

 

The diagram above is a common, or a slightly above average Midwest hunting property (the terrain and amount of timber is a blessing). As you can see, feeder site #1 utilizes all of the checklists and even goes above and beyond by integrating a bit of hunting strategy. Water, food sources, a plot screen, bedding areas, and access are all present allowing the site to be optimized for deer usage and traffic. You will also notice another feeder site…this is where hunting strategy really takes off.

Deer Feeders and Hunting Strategies

Even if your state does not allow hunting over bait you can still create the attraction and central hubs for deer socialization. These usually take the form of food plots and crop fields, but by adding other factors like water, feeders, scrapes, and minerals you can create an even more popular destination that imprints in the mind of the deer herd. This impression stays with a deer even well after the bait is removed. Hunting strategy in relation to deer feeders should focus on this aspect, again regardless of whether or not bait is legal to hunt over or not.

From the diagram, you can see two feeder/bait sites. By creating two “social hotspots” pivoting on food sources you can create hunting opportunities for two scenarios. The wind dictates hunting…period. Bow hunters live and die by this simple observation and strategy. By installing and running two feeder sites, one for north winds and one for south winds, you create hunting opportunities regardless of the prevailing wind. This reiterates the fact that there is much to think about before a deer feeder is placed and filled!

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Deer Feeder Site Necessities

What is the ideal set up for a feeder site? Think about the obvious needs. With deer coming in continuously the feeder makes the ideal site for trail cameras. Beyond cameras, it also is an ideal site to create the idea of “social hotspots”. Mineral blocks and scrapes are also items that can add to the attraction and usage of the feeder sites. When it comes to trail camera usage check out the blog below on Trail Camera Tips. It gives insight into the setup, settings, and tips for each scenario such as a camera over feed.

A couple more tips for feeding deer out of a feeder include two tips that can greatly help the success you achieve with a site. When filling/re-filling feeders, spread a bit of feed around the feeder…especially when you are introducing a feeder for the first time on a hunting property. Also be cautious of the scent, not for pressure but for nuisance animals. Take hand sanitizer or a field spray with you to spray your hands before going from the feeder to your trail camera. Feed scent on a trail camera could create enough interest for a raccoon to destroy the camera in search of more food!

Conclusion

Is a supplemental feed program beneficial for your deer and hunting? Yes. Can a deer feeder integrate and enhance your hunting strategy? Yes. Should you use a deer feeder on your hunting property? It depends… If you have the need or want for more attraction, can keep up with the demands of running a feeder, and have checked your state’s regulations on feeding deer then the answer is yes! Keep an eye out for more content on deer feeders and hunting strategy on the Get Muddy Blog.

Was this article on deer feeders 101 helpful? Leave a reply! Whether it’s a simple question or comment we would appreciate the feedback!

Ground Blind Hunting Tips Photo Credit: Trophy Pursuit

Ground Blind Hunting Tips for the Late Season

 

Ground Blind Hunting Tips For Late Season Hunting

The 9th inning has arrived and while to many hunters that sounds like we are the bearer of bad news, it, in fact, is quite the opposite. Knowledge is power, and in this case, it is your only opportunity at scoring a 9th inning buck. For the past several weeks our blog topics have been diving into preparation for the late season. It now seems to be a fit time to dive straight into the actual hunting tactics. For the last weeks of deer season, a ground blind stands as one of best tools a hunter can possibly use. The characteristics of the late season intertwined with a ground blind’s effectiveness is unrivaled during this time period. Take these ground blind hunting tips for the late season and apply them to your hunting strategy. The time period, the tool, these tips, and the strategy all come together to give you a chance at that 9th inning buck you are so desperately seeking.

With state’s firearms seasons closing, bucks are finally starting to feel the effects of relentless hunting pressure lifting off of properties. This godsend goes hand in hand with the arrival of cold temperatures and the attraction of late season food sources. These ingredients spell out a recipe for one of the best times to kill you hit-list buck, even when it is the 9th inning! The reason for this is not just due in part to the biology and behavior of white-tailed deer, but what tools have been made available that are so extremely effective during these last weeks.

Trail Cameras Tell the Story

In the past weeks, the relentless preparation and work to establish intel on late season food sources have been put entirely on the shoulders of trail cameras. In recent weeks we have provided countless trail camera tips, and trail camera settings for the late season in order to help you discover a “patternable” mature buck on these food sources.

 

 

For all practical purposes, trail cameras have started and are currently telling the story of the late season. With the help of both trail cameras on time-lapse mode, and trail cameras in late season funnels a mature buck cannot go unseen when entering a late season food source. Now, with the season running out of pages so to speak, hunters look for a hunting tool and tactic to finish and close the book on a hit-list buck!

Blinds Finish It

During this time of year blinds, in general, take precedence over tree stands. Whether you favor box blinds, elevated ground blinds, mobile ground blinds, or bale blinds doesn’t matter, the simple fact is that they are the best tool for the job. Why?

Whitetail 101 Episode 17 from Muddy’s Trophy Pursuit on Vimeo.

Bill Winke, the host of Midwest Whitetail and Muddy’s Whitetail 101, explains why blinds are the only tool for the job in the late season. The very nature of deer and the late season support this reasoning…

  • It’s Cold –Temperatures dropping beneath 32 degrees packs quite a punch, especially with a 10 mph wind backing it. Blinds offer a hunter a windscreen and ultimately provides a hunter with a buffer from the weather and late season elements.
  • Deer are FED UP with Movement– By now deer are extremely wary of the slightest movements. This can make hunting from a tree stand nearly impossible. Rather, a ground blind or elevated box blind allows you to conceal your movements.
  • Food Source– In this period of deer season, with the deer so heavily focused on food, easily mobile ground blinds can easily be placed and moved in and around the food sources according to patterns and wind directions.

While blinds might be the best tool for the late season, no tool is without a flaw. The simple fact is that you are at the deer’s level. This requires extra precautions from both their sight and sense of smell. Ground blind hunting in the late season requires special attention in the placement according to both the deer and the food source.

Ground Blind Hunting and Placement Tips


Trail Cameras Weekly’s Weston Schrank walk you through how to determine the perfect spot for the blind on your late season food source. It will depend entirely on these 5 features. Take a good look at these features not only when you are setting up the blind, but every time you hunt as they are constantly changing.

 

  • Food Source – Identify and take a good look at the food source and all of the features and characteristics of the area.
  • Bedding Area – Figure out where the closest bedding area is, also consider where a mature buck might bed.
  • Funnels and Runs – You need to identify the main funnel or easiest travel route for the deer utilizing the food source.
  • Wind and Thermals– The wind direction and more importantly thermals are the most important consideration in relation to your blind setup location, the bedding area, and where the deer will be.
  • Hunter Access -Your entrance/exit route must be safe during the day and night, In order to keep the food source pressure free.

 

By looking at a map and scouting the food source and surrounding area, the above 5 features will easily suggest the best location for the blind.

Other Ground Blind Hunting Tips for the Late Season

Remember, late season hunting is nearly always afternoon hunting. It is ideal for the late season as deer work their way out of the bedding areas on very cold days to feed on the food source early to avoid the frigid temps of the early morning. This feeding will occur in daylight for the most part as they simply need more time to feed! This means thermals mid-hunt to the last hour of light will begin to drop off the hills and follow topography like water. The goal is to set the blind up where we can access it without walking across where we expect deer for scent purposes, or allow deer in the bedding area to see us, and also needing to consider our exit in relation to deer feeding in the field. At the same time, you must make sure the wind direction and/or the falling thermals are exiting the field in a way that for the most part deer will not catch your wind.

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By reading these ground blind hunting tips, you should walk away with three key take home points…One, the 9th inning is not the time to give up on deer season. Two, you should be hunting out of a ground blind during the late season. Finally three, there is a lot more to setting up a ground blind that simply placing it for the shot. With ideal blind setups for late season hunting, observations in place, and required prep work from trail cameras and scouting, you will be setting yourself up for success in either this week or the cold weeks to come!

Christmas Gifts for Hunters

Muddy’s Sales and Deals | Christmas Gifts For Hunters

Christmas Gifts For Hunters

Now is the time for forgiveness! Your loved one has been most likely in the woods since October, but now that the main part of hunting season is over, they are finally back. What says forgiveness more than “I’m sorry”? How about a couple items under the tree inspired by his passion? If you are looking for Christmas gifts for hunters then you have come to the right place. We have some great deals on items for the hunter in your family!

Nothing says Merry Christmas like a brand new tree stand or blind. Whether you like it or not, even though deer season is over your husband, wife, boyfriend, girlfriend, son, or whoever else you’re shopping for is already thinking about next year. A new tree stand or blind will excite them for next year, and fuel their passion during the offseason! Check out the deals below!

1.The Muddy Boss XL

       $10 OFF the Muddy Boss XL

Promo code: boss10

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PRODUCT FEATURES

Removable, Water-Resistant, Triple-Foam Padded Seat for All Day Comfort!
Wide Stance Platform with Fixed Footrest
Seat Flips Back for Full Platform Use

PRODUCT SPECS

  • CONSTRUCTION: Steel
  • FOOT PLATFORM: 25” Wide x 34” Deep, Fixed Footrest
  • SEAT SIZE: 18” Wide x 12” Deep
  • SEAT STYLE: 3” Triplex Foam, Flips Back
  • SEAT HEIGHT: 22”
  • PACKABLE: Designed to Pack Together with Several Compatible Muddy Climbing Systems(sold separately)
  • FASTENERS: 1-2” Silent Slide Buckle Strap
  • STAND WEIGHT: 20 Lbs.
  • TREE SIZE: Minimum 9” Diameter
  • WEIGHT RATING: 300 Lbs.
  • HARNESS: Full Body Fall Arrest Harness Included

2. The Muddy Outfitter

SAVE $10 and get FREE SHIPPING on the Outfitter

Promo code: outfitfree

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PRODUCT FEATURES

Removable, Waterproof, Flip-Back, Triple Foam Padded Seat
Wide Stance Platform with Flip Back Footrest
Seat & Foot Platform Adjust

PRODUCT SPECS

  • CONSTRUCTION: Steel,
  • FOOT PLATFORM: 24” Wide x 34” Deep, Flipback Footrest;
  • SEAT SIZE: 15” Wide x 11” Deep;
  • SEAT STYLE: 3″ Triplex Foam, Waterproof, Flips Back, Removable;
  • SEAT HEIGHT: 24”;
  • PACKABLE: Designed to Pack Together with Several Compatible Muddy Climbing Systems(sold separately);
  • FASTENERS: 1-1” Silent Cam-Buckle Strap; 1-1″ Looped Ratchet Strap
  • STAND WEIGHT: 18 Lbs.;
  • TREE SIZE: Minimum 9” Diameter;
  • WEIGHT RATING: 300 Lbs.;
  • HARNESS: Full Body Fall Arrest Harness Included

3.The Muddy Grandstand

$25 OFF the Muddy Grandstand

Promo code: grand25

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PRODUCT DESCRIPTION

Super Comfortable & Spacious Seat that Flips Back for Full Platform Use
Extra Wide and Angled Steps with Hand Rails
Flip-Back TWO-WAY Adjustable Padded Shooting Rail that Adjusts Height and Depth
Flip-Back Footrest
1 x Drink Holder + 1 x Accessory Hook

PRODUCT SPECS

  • CONSTRUCTION: Steel, DXT & RS Tubing
  • HEIGHT TO SHOOTING RAIL: 16′
  • FOOT PLATFORM: 28″ Wide X 35″ Deep, Flip-Back Footrest
  • SEAT SIZE: 24″ Wide X 17″ Deep
  • SEAT STYLE: Flex-Tek, Flips Back
  • SEAT HEIGHT: 21″
  • BACKREST: 26″ Wide x 17″ Tall
  • SHOOTING RAIL: 2-Way Adjustable, Padded, Flips Back
  • FASTENERS: 2- 1″ Ratchet Straps,2- 1″ Stabilizer Straps
  • SUPPORT BAR: Adjustable
  • LADDER SECTIONS: 3 x Single Rail; Bolted, Wide Angled Steps
  • STAND WEIGHT: 99 Lbs.
  • WEIGHT RATING: 350 Lbs.
  • TREE SIZE: Minimum 9″ Diameter
  • HARNESS: 1 Safety Harness Included

4.The Woodsman Climbing Tree Stand

SAVE $30 and get FREE SHIPPING on the Woodsman Climbing Tree Stand

Promo code: woodsman16

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PRODUCT DESCRIPTION

Non-Slip Slats on Foot Platform
Flip-Back Foot Rest
Rubber Coated Foot Straps
Padded, Sling-Style Seat for Comfort
Padded Backrest
Accessory Bag Included
Backpack Straps Included
Hybrid Mounting System (Hybrid MS); Flexible Like a Cable. Strong Like a Chain
Spring-Loaded Pin for Quick, Easy Chain Adjustments

PRODUCT SPECS

  • CONSTRUCTION: Aluminum
  • FOOT PLATFORM: 20.5″ Wide x 29.5″ Deep, Flip Back Footrest
  • SEAT SIZE: 17″ Wide x 11″ Deep
  • SEAT STYLE: 2″ Thick Foam
  • SEAT FEATURES: Slides Back,  Adjustable, Removable
  • BACKREST: 2″ Thick Foam
  • PACKABLE: Yes, 2 Backpack Straps Included
  • CLIMBING SYSTEM: 2X Hybrid Climbing Chains
  • FASTENERS: 2X Hybrid Climbing Chains w/Spring-Bolt Knob,1-1″ Cam-Buckle Strap
  • PADDING: Padded Armrests and Seat Bar for Comfort
  • STAND WEIGHT: 20 LBS
  • TREE SIZE: Minimum 9″ Diameter
  • WEIGHT RATING: 300 LBS
  • HARNESS: Full Body Fall Arrest Harness Included

5.XLT Stagger Steps

SAVE $40 and get FREE SHIPPING on the XLT Stagger Steps (3 Pk)

Promo code: staggerfree

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PRODUCT DESCRIPTION

For an even safe climb to your perfect hunting spot, the XLT Stagger Steps from Muddy are made extra wide for stability. Designed for use on crooked or leaning trees, XLT Stagger Steps give you an easy and fast climb. Powder-coated steel specialty texture adds no-slip grip. Durable orange nylon washers, spacers, and caps provide no metal-on-metal contact, producing no noise that could scare game. The XLT Stagger Steps are packable for easy carrying and storage. Comes with three Stagger Steps. Total height: 16′ (18” between sections). Section dimensions: 46″H x 14″W. Total weight: 21 lbs.

FEATURES

  • Extra-wide steps for stability
  • Designed for use on crooked or leaning trees
  • Powder-coated steel specialty texture adds grip
  • Durable orange nylon washers, spacers, & caps
  • Packable for easy carrying & storage

6.The Ravage

$10 OFF the Muddy Ravage

 Promo code: ravage10

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PRODUCT DESCRIPTION

Sets up in Seconds!
Completely Blacked-Out Interior
Silent, One-Hand Release Hooks for Window Adjustment
9 Steel Stakes with Interior Stake Pocket
2 Interior Gear Pockets
Standard Carry Bag Included

PRODUCT SPECS

  • CONSTRUCTION: Black Backed, Water Resistant Fabric in Epic Camo
  • DIMENSIONS: 72” Shooting Width x 64” Standing Height
  • HEIGHT TO BOTTOM OF WINDOWS: Corner Windows – 23”Center Windows – 34”
  • CARRYING BAG: Standard Carry Bag with Backpack Straps
  • STAKES: 9 Steel Stakes Included in Stake Pocket
  • DOOR: Easy Access Door with Full-Length Zipper
  • TOTAL WEIGHT: 18.5 Lbs.
  • WINDOW SECURING: Removable Shoot-Through Mesh with Silent One Hand Release Hooks to Adjust & Lower
  • BRUSH STRIPS: Lower Strips Included for Easy Adaption to Your Location
  • OTHER FEATURES: 4 Tie-Down Ropes to Secure Against Wind

7. The Portable Bale Blind

$25 OFF the Portable Bale Blind

Promo code: port25

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PRODUCT DESCRIPTION

47” Wide x 20” Tall Waterfowl Window
Large Zippered Door
8 Windows 12” Wide x 16” Tall
Windows are reversible, with Burlap on One Side and Black on the Other
Bottom Wind Flaps
Packs away to fit in a truck bed for portability
Brush ties and brush strips throughout the blind

PRODUCT SPECS

  • CONSTRUCTION: Powder-Coated Steel Covered with Black-Backed, Water-Resistant Denier Fabric+Burlap
  • DIMENSIONS: 61″ Wide x 63″ Long Shooting Width x 76″ Standing Height
  • HEIGHT TO BOTTOM OF WINDOWS: 32″
  • WATERFOWL OPENING: 47″ Wide x 20″ Tall
  • BRUSH STRIPS: Brush Ties & Brush Strips Included for Easy Adaption to Your Location
  • DOOR: Large Zippered Door
  • OTHER FEATURES: Reversible Shooting Windows,Bottom Wind Flap
  • TOTAL WEIGHT: 54 Lbs.

8. The Commander Double Ladder Stand

$10 OFF + FREE SHIPPING on the Muddy Commander Double Ladder Stand

Promo code: commanderfree

 

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PRODUCT DESCRIPTION

Padded, Flip-Back Shooting Rest
3” Thick Seat
Padded Side Rails

PRODUCT SPECS

  • CONSTRUCTION: Steel;
  • HEIGHT TO SHOOTING RAIL: 18’;
  • FOOT PLATFORM: 36.5” Wide x 12.5” Deep;
  • SEAT SIZE: 38” Wide x 12” Deep;
  • SEAT STYLE: 3” Triplex Foam;
  • SEAT HEIGHT: 19”;
  • SHOOTING RAIL: Padded, Flips Back;
  • FASTENERS: 1-1” Ratchet Strap,2-1” Stabilizer Straps;
  • SUPPORT BAR: Adjustable;
  • LADDER SECTIONS: 3 x Single Rail; Bolted;
  • STAND WEIGHT: 53 Lbs.;
  • WEIGHT RATING: 500 Lbs.;
  • TREE SIZE: Minimum 9” Diameter;
  • HARNESS: 2 Safety Harnesses Included

9.The Outlander

$10 OFF the Muddy Outlander

Promo code: outlander10

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PRODUCT DESCRIPTION

Padded Flip-Back Shooting Rail
Flip-Back Footrest

PRODUCT SPECS

  • CONSTRUCTION: Steel
  • HEIGHT TO SHOOTING RAIL: 17’
  • FOOT PLATFORM: 19” Wide x 10” Deep, Flip-Back Footrest
  • SEAT SIZE: 18” Wide x 13” Deep
  • SEAT STYLE: Flex-Tek
  • SEAT HEIGHT: 20”
  • BACKREST: 18” x 13” Tall
  • SHOOTING RAIL: Padded, Flips Back
  • FASTENERS: 1-1” Ratchet Strap,2-1” Stabilizer Straps
  • SUPPORT BAR: Adjustable
  • LADDER SECTIONS: 3 x Single Rail – Bolted
  • STAND WEIGHT: 43 Lbs.
  • WEIGHT RATING: 300 Lbs.
  • TREE SIZE: Minimum 9” Diameter
  • HARNESS: 1 Safety Harness Included


Anyone of these Christmas gifts for hunters should put a smile on the face of your hunter in the family. If you enjoyed these deals and ideas, check out our blog on stocking stuffers for hunters!

Stocking Stuffers for Hunters

Stocking Stuffers for Hunters | Muddy’s Stocking Stuffers

Stocking Stuffers for Hunters

To go along with our Christmas gifts for hunters, we thought we would go ahead and supply you with some stocking stuffer ideas! Stocking stuffers for hunters are easy to buy, as the hunter in your family always could use more hunting accessories and gear! These 9 stocking stuffer items will fill their stocking full with quality items that the hunter will enjoy for many seasons!

1. Telescoping Multi-Hanger


PRODUCT DESCRIPTION

Folds Down to 8.75″ for Storage
Hook Arm Adjusts 360°
Leg Grip for Extra Strength
Easy Installation with Screw-In Steel Tip

PRODUCT SPECS

  • CONSTRUCTION: Aluminum and Steel;
  • SIZE: Ranges from 7.25″ – 21.5″ Length with Non-Slip Grip Rubber Coated Hook;
  • WEIGHT RATING: 30 Lbs

2. Short Hook Multi Hanger

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PRODUCT DESCRIPTION

2″ Single J-Hook with 40-Lb Capacity
Dual 6.5″ Non-Slip Grip Rubber Coated Hooks with 10-Lb Weight Limit Each
Hook Arms Adjust 180°
Folds Down to 8″ for Storage
Steel Tip Cover with Easy Clip-On Carabiner

PRODUCT SPECS

  • CONSTRUCTION: Steel;
  • WEIGHT CAPACITY: 60 Lbs Total – 2″ Single J-Hook – 40 Lb Capacity, Dual 6.5″ Rubber Coated Hooks – 10 Lb Weight Limit Each

3. EZ Twist Pull Up Rope

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PRODUCT DESCRIPTION

Easy to Use Even With a Gloved Hand and Does Not Scratch Gear
Folds Up Flat and Small for Storage
Silent, EZ Twist-Tie, Rubber-Coated End

PRODUCT SPECS

  • DESIGN: 25′ Long Flat, Tangle-Free Design

4. Tree Stand Canopy


PRODUCT DESCRIPTION

Guaranteed Protection From the Elements
Camouflage Underside for Natural Appearance

PRODUCT SPECS

  • CONSTRUCTION: Heavy-Duty, Water-Resistant Fabric;
  • SIZE: 46″ Wide x 60″ Long;
  • PORTABLE: Folds up to 27.25″ for Transport

5. Trail Camera: Pro Cam 10

deer hunting cold fronts trail camera tips | Muddy Outdoors


PRODUCT DESCRIPTION

10 Megapixel
2 – 6 Photo Bursts
Standard VGA (32 FPS)
1.5 Second Trigger Speed
Invisible Flash with 18 HE LEDs
Simple to Program
Backlit LCD Screen to easily navigate through settings any time of day

PRODUCT SPECS

  • SIZE: 4.75″ H x 4.25″ W x 2.5″ D;
  • SCREEN: Backlit LCD Screen;
  • FLASH RANGE: 50’+; LEDS: 18;
  • IMAGE QUALITY: 10 Megapixel;
  • TRIGGER DELAY: 7 Options: 10 Sec – 30 Min.;
  • IMAGE DATA: Camera ID, Date, Time, Temp, & Moon Phase;
  • VIDEO: 4 Options: 10 – 60 Seconds Length;
  • MOUNTING OPTIONS: Adjustable Strap with Buckle; Alternate: 1/4″ – 20;
  • THEFT DETERRENCE: Cable Lock and Padlock Ready;
  • BATTERY TYPE: 6 AA or 12V DC Alternate Power Option;
  • COLOR: Non-Reflective Brown;
  • MATERIAL: Molded ABS; Waterproof Housing;
  • MEMORY: Requires Secure Digital Card, Up to 32GB;
  • PRODUCT WARRANTY: 1 Year;
  • OPERATING TEMP: -10 Degrees F to 140 Degrees F;
  • DETECTION RANGE: 50′;
  • FIELD OF VIEW: 3 Zone + 50 Degree Detection Angle;
  • BURST INTERVAL: 2 Seconds;
  • BATTERY LIFE: Up to 10,000 Images

6. Trail Camera Support Mount

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PRODUCT DESCRIPTION

ORDER 6 OR MORE AND GET THEM FOR $6.00 PER

Can be adjusted to any direction or angle desired!
Easily screws into tree or wooden posts

PRODUCT SPECS

  • CONSTRUCTION: Steel;
  • WEIGHT RATING: 10 Lbs.;
  • USAGE: Screws securely into tree;
  • WORKS ON MOST CAMERAS WITH A 1/4″-20 RECEIVER;
  • FULLY ADJUSTABLE: Camera mount can be adjusted to any direction & angle

7. Long Accessory Hooks

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PRODUCT DESCRIPTION

The hook is designed for use in multiple stand locations securely keeps your bow and other hunting gear within reach. Coated hooks won’t scratch or damage your bow or other gear, while the sharp metal tip screws easily into any tree for a secure hold. Each individual hook has a ten-pound weight rating.

PRODUCT SPECS

  • Construction Extra Long Rubber Coated Steel Hook
  • Design Screws into tree; 24-count Retailer Pack for Individual Sale
  • Weight Limit 10 Lbs.

8. Xecute Scent Control Starter Pack

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PRODUCT DESCRIPTION

Looking for an all-around scent control product pack for this season. We are featuring a Xecute Starter Pack to cover everything from Shower to Field.

The Xecute Scent Control Starter Pack Features:

  • Body Wash (8 oz)
  • Conditioner (8 oz)
  • Field Spray (16 oz)
  • Shampoo (8 oz)

9. Muddy Safe-Line

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PRODUCT DESCRIPTION

A Unique System that Allows the User to Stay Attached to the Tree at all Times!
Two Prusik Knots; Slides Easily Up and Down the Rope During Ascent and Descent and Stops You IMMEDIATELY Should a Fall Occur
Prusik Knots made of Reflective Material that Enhance Daytime and Low-Light Visibility

PRODUCT SPECS

  • CONSTRUCTION: Braided Nylon; USE: Stay Safe from the Moment You Leave the Ground to the Time You Return!; Length: 30’;
  • WEIGHT RATING: 300 Lbs.

These stocking stuffers will put a smile on the face of the hunter in your family, especially paired up with one of the many items under the tree from our Christmas gifts on sale right now! Any hunter would be ecstatic to unwrap any number of these items on Christmas day!

late season deer hunting tips | Muddy Outdoors

Late Season Deer Hunting | Your Preparation Starts Now

Late Season Deer Hunting Preparation

The trees have shed their leaves, and now a cold, gray, and bleak look has overtaken the once beautiful, burnt orange woods. The arrival of grim, dull, and cold days may seem like an awful end to your already painful deer season, however, you shouldn’t throw the towel just yet. While the rest of the season may look pretty bleak, late season deer hunting can actually be laden with opportunities. This blog will help you prepare for the late season before it ramps up to its full potential.

What is the Late Season?

When the intense action of the rut subsides we are left with a long drawn out period of desperation. A buck’s reserves are depleted, they are slim after the energy loss of the rut giving them a strong need and urge to find a reliable resource. After November, when the cold temperatures of December and January hit this late season period begins. The number one thing on everyone’s mind (both hunters and deer) is food.

Patterning a Buck for the Late Season
On this episode, Bill Winke discusses patterning a buck for the late season. The rut is over, and once again whitetails are focusing on food!

 

Late Season Food Sources

So what are the late season food sources that you should look out for?

  1. Standing Beans and Corn – Soybean food plots, Corn plots, or corn/beans on leased cropland that have simply yet to be cut and are still standing can become a critical attraction and food sources in the late season and in winter.
  2. Brassicas- Brassicas is another name for plant species such as turnips, radishes, and rape, common late season food sources that can be major attractants if enough acreage is planted.
  3. Cereal Grains – Winter rye, wheat, and oats can be in the form of cover crops, and are common late season food plots that can offer deer a green buffet as the cold temperatures arrive.
  4. Acorns– On good mast years there can be a bounty of acorns still left in the woods come the late season.
  5. Browse- Early successional species such as blackberries, black raspberries, greenbrier, and various saplings are critical food in the winter months. Areas of disturbance or overgrown pastures offering cover and food should not be overlooked.

Once you identify and find a late season food source on your property, then it is time for the next step in preparation…setting up your trail cameras.

Trail Camera Tips For Late Season

Your biggest concern before the best days of the late season arrive should be your trail cameras. Cold temps force deer to hit food early in the afternoons, which can bring mature bucks out in daylight. This daily pattern once the cold temperatures arrive and stay can become one of the best opportunities of the year at a mature buck. But not without the help of trail cameras. This is the week to change up your trail camera strategy, setup new camera spots and adjust the settings from rut focused to late season focused. With food being the focus our trail camera tips take the form of what they were during the early season… check out the trail camera tips below to dial in on a mature buck’s pattern.

Trail Camera Tips for the Late Season

 

Time-Lapse

The first and most dependable is the time-lapse function on a trail camera. For this function you want to have a camera with great quality, the Muddy Pro Cam 12s have 12-megapixel images so they work great for the late season.

Setup: To hang the camera you simply hang the camera where it can clearly see the whole field. You want a good vantage and one very important tip is not facing the setting sun

Settings: For the settings on the camera you want to have the function set to the last 1-2 hours of daylight and a photo every 30 seconds to a minute. Make sure you have a big memory card, a 16gb will do fine.

Notes: By doing this, it allows you to survey how many, and which deer are using the food source during legal hunting times, and it also can help you pinpoint mature bucks patterns…and where to hang the second camera for late season Intel!

Late Season Funnels

By identifying the bedding area and looking at the topography, in consideration to the food source you will be able to clearly see where the most traffic is coming into and out of the field. By setting a game camera on these late season funnels, and using the same setup and settings as we did during the rut, we can more easily track a buck’s movement.

Setup: Set the trail camera up at a 45-degree angle from the run or funnel.

Settings: A long video mode, or 6-8 photo burst with a short 10-second delay

Notes: This setup gives you intel during the night, which the time-lapse function does not, potentially revealing just after dark movements telling you that you should move towards the bedding area to catch a buck during daylight.

By finding the main late season food source on your property, following these trail camera tips for the late season, and put together what you already know about a buck you can start gathering intel on a buck’s pattern before the temps get cold. Stay out of the food sources until those cold temps hit, and you have enough intel to make a move on a buck. As we progress through the late season remember these tips, and be careful not to over pressure your food source.

This is just the beginning of the late season, be sure to check back in each week for new relevant content!

october deer hunting | Muddy Outdoors

2 Bucks That Show You Shouldn’t Dismiss October Deer Hunting

2 Giant Bucks That Prove October Deer Hunting Can Be Successful

What you are looking at are two bucks “Lefty” and “Danger”…and they are both examples of October deer hunting perfected. This is a smack in the face for many hunters. All too often bow hunters dismiss the first 3 weeks of October as fruitless and barren as far as deer movement and harvest opportunities are concerned. If you have up to this point been one of these hunters…the small amount of days left in October should be exploited.

The two bucks shown above and below are proof that big mature bucks can and will be brought down throughout October. If these two stories don’t change your mind about October upon watching them, will prove you might just be the most stubborn hunter in the woods to date.

Bill Winke’s “Lefty”

october deer hunting | Muddy OutdoorsOctober 19th Bill WInke had his last encounter with a buck he called “Lefty”. If you follow the Midwest Whitetail show at all, you were kept up to date with every single photo, trail camera image and video that Bill got of “Lefty”. Throughout the season Bill dove into a constant state of patterning “Lefty” with his Muddy trail cameras. In fact, in his weekly web show “Whitetail 101” featured on Muddy TV, he discussed “Lefty” on episodes, keeping an audience up to date with the buck’s home range, recent movements, and status. Even when the mature buck “Lefty” broke off his G3 on his signature left beam, Bill kept us up to date.

Midwest Whitetail’s signature, the thing the audience loves the most about the show, is that it is semi-live content. Every week, you get the latest intel, hunts, and what is coming up from the guys that are actually out there hunting. Some of this semi-live content is available on Muddy TV  under the web show name “Whitetail 101”. The weekly episode, Episode 8: October Cold Fronts, covering the hunting strategy Bill was going to be using, actually explained the scenario that led to the successful harvest of “Lefty”.

Whitetail 101 Ep9, “October Cold Fronts”

Bill’s focus for the week of hunting was to concentrate on cut corn fields. As soon as the combines rolled out, Bill went in. This tactic and information that he presented to the audience could not have proven to be any more reliable as the buck he named “Lefty” worked his way into the field.

Iowa Giant | Winke’s Quest for “Lefty

Mark Drury’s “Danger” 217 2/8” Inch Buck

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Another big name in hunting, Mark Drury of Drury Outdoors, found success with a very very impressive deer during October. Again, this particular buck was brought down with help of trail camera info. A build up of trail camera information from previous years and recent information on the bedding area where “Danger” resided, led Mark to believe that hunting the bedding area would pay off big.

After the thought, the strategy went into place Mark built a platform for, and hauled in a Muddy Bull box blind to hunt “Danger”. Mark spent a couple hours setting up the box blind, and trimming shooting lanes and set up for the day he would go in after “Danger”.

box blinds score sheet Blind | Muddy Outdoors

Takeaways From These Bucks

The takeaways from these bucks killed in October is obviously that October is a month to hunt. We all to often hear of hunters that completely dismiss October deer hunting as a “good” month of hunting, when in fact it could be the best to your specific situation. Sure October is a month of rapid change, this change is associated with homornes, weather, food sources and the changing deer movement as a result of those factors. But if you have the knowledge of how to kill a buck in October, then you can use the month of bow huting to its full potential.

This knowledge can be summed up from these two hunts that give you some amzing hunting tips for October. Bill WInke’s buck “Lefty” was killed using the information he revealed on his weekly show “Whitetail 101”. Cut corn fields, again the same information he told the audience “could pull deer off acorns during October”, led him to a successful harvest of his number one hit-list buck. But before this, with keeping up with both Midwest Whitetail and Whitetail 101, the audience viewed the entire strategy laid out behind the deer and the hunt that day. Years of trail camera information suggested not only the buck’s personality, but his home range depending on the month and time of the year. This supplied Bill with information to where the buck “Lefty” might be bedded, giving Bill the intel he needed to stay out of the area.

The biggest mistake hunters can make in October is being carelessly aggressive after a buck. Going after a buck is one thing, but being careless in you scent strategys, entry and exit routes, noise, and stand setup will ruin the hunt and your chance for the deer. Bill took extreme caution on this buck. This mostly came with his trail camera strategies, not being to invasive with his placement, wearing rubber waders while checking cards, and keeping the pressure off the buck.

Mark Drury used the same strategies with his buck “Danger”. The trail camera intel was invaluable, but his hunt brings with it a new factor that you absolutely should be paying attention to this time of year. Mark looked for an October cold front, just like the one that is explained and laid out in the blog: Deer Hunting October Cold Fronts. With a cold front pushing cooler temperature and a rise in pressure, Mark planned to go in for an aggressive hunt. The combination with the weather and an optimally placed Muddy Bull box blind came together for the harvest of the number one hit-list buck “Danger”.

Both of these giants are tangible evidence that October is more that a month to sweep under the rug. Each and every week we bring you new, “fresh” content on our semi-live, always available channel, Muddy TV. You will find several shows giving you the latest hunting observations, how tos, and tips for each week of hunting! October is not over, now is the time to get aggressive and go after the bucks, with of course the tips and tactics you have learned today.

filming deer hunts | Muddy Outdoors

Guideline and Expert Tips for Filming Deer Hunts

Filming Deer Hunts | Guidelines and Expert Tips For Filming

As much as technology has greatly improved the way we send and receive information, it has also totally revolutionized the way we capture information as well.  From taking screenshots and photographs to capturing video, technology has made it possible for the everyday person to scratch their creative itch when it comes to photography and videography, and the outdoor world is certainly no exception.  It wasn’t long ago when filming your own deer hunt meant packing close to a hundred pounds of camera gear, and tapes into the woods.  This gear was often so bulky and cumbersome that it was difficult to not only put in a tree but being able to move the camera fluidly to capture the right angle was often very challenging.  Today, it has all changed!  Camera equipment has become smaller, lighter and easier to use.  Hard VHS tapes have given way to SIM Cards and digital video and videography equipment has become more diversified, with many products specifically made for the deer hunter in mind.

Clearly, when it comes to filming your own hunts, especially when it comes to deer hunting there is a wide range of camera gear that has helped a lot of hunters fulfill their dream of filming their own hunt.  Of all the gear and equipment that has helped make these dreams a reality, there is one critical piece of hardware that made all the difference…the camera arm.  Though often underappreciated today’s camera arms have helped to bridge the gap when it comes to capturing that perfect shot and filming a deer hunt of a lifetime.  This article will be your guideline for filming deer hunts, as well as suggest a few critical pieces that you will need.

Guideline To Filming Deer Hunts

If you are considering filming your own hunts this fall, or just simply wish to brush up on your skills then you have come to the right place. Regardless of what level you are at, amateur or professional, chances are it all started with watching a hunting show. Watching the success, and flawless camera work of other hunters on TV or on the web is most likely what inspired you to consider bringing camera equipment up in the tree. If you are inspired and drawn to start filming deer hunts then you need to start doing your research. Look into what camera to buy to film hunting, what camera arms to buy, what camera equipment you need, and what considerations you should take note of. That information will go a long way in helping you get started. Here are two blogs that could help you in that regard.

Which Camera to Buy for Filming Deer Hunts | How to Film Your Own Deer Hunt: Part 1

Camera Equipment to Buy | How To Film Your Own Deer Hunt Part 2

While it might seem like a no-brainer to go ahead and start buying gear and filming hunts, if you want great quality or “pro-staff”/ TV show quality then more research should be done. Of course, quality comes with experience so taking a few pointer from this guideline doesn’t hurt.

For this guideline, no one is better to take tips from than Bill Winke and the guys/hunters/cameramen at Midwest Whitetail.  Over the years every pro staff member, cameraman, hunter, or even intern for that matter has managed to lay down some amazing footage. The hardest part is it is always consistently getting better with each year. Over the years they have managed to produce a couple of very informative videos on the subject that they have mastered. We have dug these videos up to aid anyone wishing to learn how to start filming deer hunts, or simply brush up on their filming skills. These videos include a step by step guideline for filming hunts, basic filming skills to master, and last but not least some creative filming techniques.

Step By Step Guideline For Filming Hunts

Filming A Proper Hunt
(Video) – A great camera operator can tell the story through their footage. This video covers the basics of filming an entire hunt. MIDWEST WHITETAIL VIDEO

 

Step 1: Getting Ready – The first step in filming a deer hunt is to film B-Roll (cutaway/filler video) of preparation and the begging of the hunt. This is the first step in the process of capturing every aspect of your hunt, to help completely tell the story.

Step 2: Opening Interview – Interview the hunter or yourself when self-filming a deer hunt. This can take place during or between the first step in getting ready. The opening interview does not have to take place in the tree stand or ground blind. This interview tells the basic situation and setup of the hunt.

Step 3: Walking In/Setup – This is often skipped in deer hunting footage as it can be a pain to get. This footage entails capturing the access method and route you take, climbing up in the tree, setting up your hunting equipment, etc.

Step 4: The 2nd Interview from Stand – This is the more common interview, the hunter in the stand describing the setup, the hunt, which bucks they are going after, the wind, weather conditions, trail camera intel, etc.

Step 5: Cutaways From Stand – This step suggests another round of B-Roll footage to put perspective on hours passing by. These shots include creative shots of the landscape, pans, leaves, your hunting equipment, the hunter, etc.

Step 6: Filming Deer – After step 5 you can turn the camera off and rest for a bit. Step 6 when filming deer hunts is to film the hunt itself, this means filming deer as they come in and around the stand, the shot, and the deer potentially crashing.

Step 7: Film Reaction Interview – Directly after the shot ( do not turn the camera off) zoom out and film the hunter’s or your reaction. It is critical to capture the emotions of the hunter, good or bad depending on the shot made and the situation. Again directly after the shot, zoom out, refocus on the hunter and capture their post shot interview.

Step 8: Staged Cutaways After Shot – This step arrives directly after step 7, while the light and settings are exactly during the time the shot was made. This B-Roll footage includes calling the deer in, grabbing the bow or gun, hooking up your release, drawing the bow back, it is filler for the intense moments the deer works into shooting range.

Step 9: Climbing Down – Again another storytelling essential. This step includes packing up gear, climbing down, and starting the blood trail.

Step 10: Tracking Footage – Filming the track job is another critical point to connect the shot and the recovery. This also helps in the case of you not finding the deer, to tell the story of how the blood trailing went.

Step 11: Reaction To Finding Deer – Film the hunter’s or your reaction as the deer/buck is recovered. Usually, an emotion capturing critical point for the video.

Step 12: Interview With Deer – After recovery, stage an interview segment. This includes a scenic area close to where the deer was shot. This is an interview for the hunter to explain the hunt, the history with the deer, and other critical information before the video ends.

Step 13: Hero Shots And Extra Cuts – This includes footage of the deer, the antlers, the shot placement, the hunter looking at the antlers, friends or family looking at the deer, and other B-Roll footage to fill the post interview with and give the audience a better look at the harvest.

Creative Filming Techniques

Creative Filming Techniques
(Video) – Being able to tell a story through footage is the ultimate goal of a camera man. In this video, we go through some of the more advanced ways to film a hunt.

It’s important to not remain to “scripted”. Staying to a basic format and the same shots over and over again could spell a disaster for your hunting footage and video. With as much footage as Midwest Whitetail lays down, it’s important that they “keep it fresh” with creative filming techniques. This is considered getting into the advanced stages of filming deer hunts, but important to keep in the back of your mind as you progress your own deer hunt filming skills.

The Base of Filming Deer Hunts: Camera Arms

Despite common misconceptions, there is more to a camera arm that meets the eye.  The biggest mistake you can make is not going with the right “base of your hunt”. Today’s camera arms offer a wide range of features that can help the hunter or cameraman flow through the step by step guide above, as well as get creative with their filming.

Much like any product, a great place to begin your filming career is at the ground level, utilizing a Basic camera arm.  A basic camera arm is just that, it’s basic, and will provide someone a solid foundation by which to mount a camera and film a hunt.  While you certainly won’t be doing anything super fancy it will certainly get the job done.  Muddy’s basic camera arm, for example, is a great option for the beginner who is headed out deer hunting, and would like to try their hand at filming their own hunt.  Like most camera arms, it can attach directly to the tree and is perfect for self-filming situations.  Weighing in at four pounds, it certainly will not add a lot of bulk to your pack which again makes it perfect for those solo-deer hunting missions.  The head of this camera arm can swing 360 degrees, which is great for capturing an “in the stand” interview right after the shot.  The arm itself will extend and swing 180 degrees which is perfect for those self-filming scenarios.

When it comes to deer hunting, even the slightest movement can often be enough to blow a hunt.  It is almost ridiculous just how easy it can be for a deer to bust a hunter in the tree stand with plenty of cover with just the slightest movement of a hand.  When it comes to filming hunts, sometimes less can really be more.  In addition, some hunters just don’t like to get too fancy.  If you fall into this category then it might be worthwhile to simply invest in a camera holder rather than a camera arm.  Muddy’s Micro-Lite camera holder is perfect for the hunter that doesn’t want to get busted while panning the camera.  This camera holder can fit onto a wide range of products like the Muddy Multi-Hanger or Tree Step and can provide you a great vantage point to take some wide angle video.  If you happen to be a self-filming coinsure with multiple cameras who is looking to capture multiple angles, this camera holder can also be a great addition to your arsenal and give you that perfect over the should vantage point.

When it comes to filming your own hunt, angles can be the biggest challenge you can face.  Wild animals don’t know how to respond to a camera.  They are unable to follow direction, and often go off script and unfortunately sometimes a poor camera angle can make the difference between pulling the trigger and not.  Having a camera arm that not only gives the videographer the proper stability to take a great video but can also adjust as needed to make sure that they keep the target in the frame is very important.  In order to check all these boxes, Muddy Outdoors developed the Hunter camera arm.  This camera arm is designed for those hunters who have dedicated to the art of filming hunts.  The Hunter camera arm offers extremely quiet joints & pivots with 47 inches of reach in over 180 degrees of swing.  Most importantly, this camera arm has five points of adjustment which should allow you capture that Pop & Young regardless of where he goes.  Most importantly, this camera arm will not weigh you down.  Tipping the scales at seven pounds, the compact design can fit into most packs and can attach to the tree in seconds.

filming deer hunts camera arms | Muddy Outdoors

There are a lot of camera arm options out there, so it is always important to do your homework before you make your purchase.  Doing the legwork ahead of time can really help you narrow down your search later.

Picking the Right Camera Arm

You have decided that you want to try your hand at filming your own hunt.  You have done a little research and have brushed up on what types of camera arms are on the market today, and now it is time to decide which one to get.  When it comes to spending your hard earned cash, especially when investing in outdoor hardware like a camera arm, it is always a good idea to spend some time thinking it through. We are all guilty of making an impulse buy every now and then but when you are talking about filming equipment, you can save yourself a lot of headaches by doing your homework and getting it right the first time.  Here are a few things to consider before purchasing your camera arm.

The first thing that you need to identify is your filming style. Are planning to truly “self-film” DIY style or is there the potential of having someone film you?  Your camera arm choice can go a couple of different ways depending on how you answer this question.  If you are looking for just a simple, DIY self-film opportunity then a product like the Basic Camera Arm or the Micro-Lite might just be the ticket.  If you and your hunting buddy are wanting to hang a couple Vantage Point’s and try your hand at some high production work then the Hunter camera arm or the Outfitter camera arm might be what you need.

Once you have identified your filming style, it is still always a smart idea to think about the terrain that you plan to film in.  It goes without saying that if you are going to be utilizing a camera arm that it is likely you will either be filming in or next to a tree, however, it is really important to consider how difficult it might be to get camera equipment in and out of your hunting area.  Although these camera arms are some of the most durable and lightest around, when it comes to traversing difficult terrain even your Magnum safety harness can start to feel heavy after a while.  Whether or not you plan to leave your camera arm permanently attached to the tree for the season can sometimes help make up the difference for a long hike, however, if you are planning to run and gun this season you should certainly consider this factor before making your camera arm selection.

Setting Your Camera Arm

Anyone how has filmed a hunt, especially a DIY self-filmed hunt will tell you there is no such thing as the perfect set up.  Trees are often uneven and leaning one way or another.  Sometimes the best killing tree doesn’t make the best filming tree.  Luckily, today’s camera arms come with several different features such as a sight level and ratchet strap fastening system that can help the hunter adjust on the fly and still come away with a solid video that they can be proud of.

When it comes to setting up your camera arm, regardless if you are being filmed or self-filming there are really two very basic rules that you need to always follow.  Rule number one; always do your best to mount the camera in the same tree the stand you will be hunting from.  While this may leave you thinking “well…duh”, you would be surprised at just how many hunters will try to secure the arm to a nearby tree, thinking that the angle may be a little better.  While the camera may seem close at the time, when a deer is into bow range even the slightest movement can be critical.  Having the camera either over your shoulder or right in front of you is hands down the best case scenario.

Rule number two, although the video is important, make sure the camera does not hinder you taking the shot.  Today’s hunting camera arms have an excellent range of motion, which allows them to be very versatile in terms of where you place them in the tree.  This versatility ensures that you have the highest probability of staying with an animal while it’s moving, and thereby ensuring that you have a better chance capturing the harvest on film.  It is very important when setting your camera arm that you think through your angles and ensure that your camera is in the right place to capture an animal passing through your shooting lanes.  Additionally, you want to make sure that the camera and camera are not in the way, making it difficult to make the shot.  So, don’t just assume because you are strapped in the tree and the camera batteries are full that you are ready to go, take some time and work through your camera angels as it can save you a lot of heartaches later on.

Filming your own hunts is an excellent challenge to pursue this fall, and can be done by anyone. The quality, however, will greatly depend on upon your camera gear and the way you handle a camera. Of course, great camera handling comes with experience, reading up on this guideline for filming deer hunts certainly does not hurt.  Taking the time to research tips and techniques, and what to invest in as far as the right equipment such as a camera arm, can really make the difference between an amateur video and a professional looking hunts.  If you are looking to up the odds and try something new this fall then consider hitting the woods with a hunting camera arm and camera in tow.  It can make for some amazing memories!

Why have mineral sites for Bucks

Muddy Trail Cameras | The Why, When, Where, and How of Minerals for Deer

What You Need To Know for Putting Out Minerals for Deer This Summer

Tree stand maintenance, shed hunting, frost seeding, food plots, and then what? This has been the schedule from this point on for about 4-5 months. By the time food plots are planted, hunters can feel a false sense of accomplishment. They feel they can begin to calm down from the mad rush of spring chores and coast it out until deer season. Unfortunately for them there is still one vital piece missing from the checklist…putting out minerals for deer!

Now when it comes to mineral stations there is a misunderstanding that the common sense logic is correct, when in fact it really isn’t. Hunters each and every year will put out mineral stations for deer and miss the true reason for why we put out minerals. This article dives into the why, when, where, and how of mineral stations for deer.

Why and When Do We Put Out Mineral Stations For Deer?

The Science Behind the Need (Or Not) for Deer Minerals | Buck Advisors

(Video) There is a big misunderstanding that minerals equal big antlers, which is not correct! The Buck Advisors’ Weston Schrank reveals the real science and reason for mineral stations for deer!

The fact that putting out mineral bags and blocks for deer to grow bigger antlers is a false assumption. The real reason we put out mineral stations for deer is due to their salt craving for the summer. This craving is present during the entire time plant growth is at its peak in spring and summer with water and potassium content at an all-time high. This also happens to be when bucks are growing antlers, and does are giving birth to fawns and lactating over the summer. This is what creates the misunderstanding, the timing and need for salt in most hunters mind has suggested that deer need minerals, which in turn covers up the true advantage.

So if not for growing bigger antlers and helping fawn development why do we put out mineral stations for deer? The answer to this is our own desire. The desire for us to see velvet bucks can take advantage of the buck’s cravings for salt, revealing the real reason for mineral stations, taking inventory of velvet bucks with trail cameras.

Where and How Many Mineral Stations to Put Out

Deer Mineral Station Placement and Density | Buck Advisors

(Video)- Putting out minerals for deer is critical to start in May and June! Buck Advisor’s Weston Schrank explains exactly how many mineral stations for deer you need and where to place them on your deer hunting property.

One of the most important pieces of information, besides actually putting out mineral stations is, installing them at the correct density and in the right location. So where do you put mineral stations for deer out on your property, and how many do you put out? For this answer we have to touch on the real reason for these mineral sites again, basically to take inventory of velvet bucks.

That word, “inventory” is used only one other time when referring to deer…trail camera surveys. While putting out trail cameras over minerals for deer isn’t necessarily a trail camera survey due to the lack of specific settings, time of year, and applying an equation, it is keeping tabs on all the deer utilizing your property. In order to do this you have to be sure you are placing the minerals and game cameras in the correct locations and density (putting enough sites out to capture all deer on the property).

  • Where: throwing out minerals or a block just anywhere will not accomplish anything, you have to think and plan around it. You need to place the minerals and trail cameras in location that deer frequent. For spring and summer this means transition areas between food sources and bedding.
  • Density: Again referring to a trail camera survey most recommendations are a mineral station for every 80-100 acres of property, but only you can really tell how many mineral stations and trail camera sites you need. Habitat diversity, topography, cover, and human pressure can all affect deer movement and core areas, ultimately deciding how many mineral stations you should have. If a 50 acre property is separated into 2 different habitat types, and resulting in two different bachelor groups using different sides of the farm, then you need 2 mineral sites. Think back to hunting observations and past trail camera pictures to determine how deer use the property.

Patterning Velvet Bucks with Mineral Stations and Trail Cameras

The ultimate goal of installing mineral stations for deer, is to keep tabs and develop patterns on mature bucks. By putting out these sites in late May and early June, and keeping them running until deer season ( if your state requires minerals to be removed) will create a very detailed history and site map of a given bucks home range and core area. It also helps you create a detailed album of antler growth throughout the summer.

If your deer season is early enough such as Kentucky with an early September opener, you might even be able to kill you hit list buck based solely off of the trail camera data from the mineral station. If your hunting season starts later in the month of October, then you will miss the chance for velvet bucks and summer patterns. Fortunately placing a mineral station and trail camera in the right spot, such as a transition area, funnel, or run between bedding areas and food sources will also be a great spot for the rut cycles. This is where another critical point can be introduced, selecting the right trail camera for the job.

Patterning Buck with Muddy Trail Cameras

The new Muddy Outdoors trail camera lineup for 2016 should be a consideration for your trail camera over the mineral stations. The Pro-Cam 12 and Pro-Cam 10 are both quality cameras that can be reliable all summer long, all season long, and for multiple years.  The cameras have all the required specs and technologies to be a top contender for trail cameras that produce clear images for identifying individual bucks during summer. If you’re looking for new trail cameras this year to put over mineral stations for deer, check out muddy trail cameras.

While your food plots are planted, tree stands are up, and your summer checklist is complete, one vital to-do might be missing. If you have yet to put mineral sites and trail cameras up you are behind. Antlers are growing, bucks are feeding, they are craving salt, and we only have 4-5 months before deer season!